Sask. safety blitz catches hundreds of drivers speeding past emergency vehicles

Regina, Saskatchewan — November 11, 2015 — The province’s motorists aren’t getting the Move Over law message, according to a recent safety blitz conducted by RCMP. The Regina Leader Post reports 478 drivers were caught zipping past emergency vehicles—including police cruisers, fire trucks, ambulances and tow trucks—over one week in June and one week in October. Police also issued 250 warnings over the same two-week period. As part of an ongoing effort to educate the public, the Highways Ministry transport patrol and other agencies teamed up with the RCMP to target drivers in violation of the law requiring motorists to reduce speeds to 60 km/h when passing parked emergency vehicles with their lights flashing. For those in the towing industry, like Geoffrey Caliaba, co-owner of Professional Towing & Recovery Service, the results of the blitz aren’t surprising. “It just seems the more time that goes by, the less people care about our safety,” Calibaba told the Post. “Over the years, I’ve noticed every year has gotten a little bit worse.” Southeast Combined Traffic Services Sask. Staff Sgt. Pete Garvey agreed, identifying the stretch of the Trans-Canada Highway east of the city as especially dangerous, where motorists are known to drive by roadside workers in excess of 110 km/hr. “Close calls with our members out on the road happen I would say almost daily,” Garvey said in the report. “I’ve had a number of close calls over my years as well, and the more we’re out on the road stopping vehicles, the higher probability or chance something disastrous is going to happen.” Garvey says he thinks people need to have more patience while driving. Those found in violation of the Move Over law face a minimum fine of $210 and three demerit points.

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