NL police remind motorists of road safety rules


UnknownDeer Lake, Newfoundland and Labrador — October 12, 2015 – A Paradise man’s dangerous actions have prompted police to urge drivers to abide by the province’s Move Over law.

The Western Star reports a man driving a 2004 Dodge Viper is facing numerous charges after fleeing from the RCMP on the Trans-Canada Highway just east of Deer Lake late last week.

RCMP Traffic Services Cpl. Curtis Stone stopped the 23-year-old on October 8 for speeding and driving with a suspended licence. The man fled the scene at around 7 p.m., almost colliding with Stone and other drivers on the highway.

The man is charged under the the Highway Traffic Act for driving while suspended and speeding and under the Criminal Code for dangerous operation of a motor vehicle and flight from police. His vehicle was seized, and he is scheduled to appear in Corner Brook provincial court on January 26.

Stone says the incident highlights the need for motorists to be aware of the Move Over law, put in place to protect roadside workers—including emergency and enforcement, tow truck and roadside assistance operators, search and rescue and public utility personnel, as well as municipal, provincial or federal enforcement or service workers.

Under the legislation, drivers must slow down and move to an adjacent lane when passing a designated emergency vehicle with its lights flashing.

Stone says a large number of drivers are ignoring the law, creating a safety issue for those who work along roadways.

It’s an issue well-known among local tow truck drivers.

“If possible, move over,” Avalon Towing’s Bob Rice told CBC Radio in September. “We’re no match for a couple thousand pounds coming at us, we’re only bone and tissue.”

Drivers found in violation of the law face fines ranging from $300 to $900 and four demerit points.

The Move Over law came into effect in Newfoundland and Labrador on March 10, 2014.

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